Your Situation









 

I feel sad

Sadness is a basic human emotion and we all feel unhappy or in a low mood from time to time, especially if we have been upset by something or we’re in pain or we feel disappointed. Sadness will arrive with different levels of intensity but is usually a temporary sensation. But how do you know when sadness has become depression?

You may be depressed if your symptoms begin to significantly impact on your daily life and these symptoms continue for 2 weeks or longer. Symptoms could include;

  • a persistent sad, anxious of empty mood
  • feelings of hopelessness and/or pessimism
  • feelings of guilt, worthlessness and/or helplessness
  • unable to find pleasure in activities you once enjoyed
  • difficulty concentrating, insomnia (waking early or oversleeping)
  • loss of appetite and weight loss or the opposite of this
  • thought of death or suicide IMPORTANT – if this applies visit our Help resource page here.

If you are concerned that you might be experiencing depression, we would recommend you make an appointment with your GP as soon as possible to discuss your symptoms. When you are feeling depressed, anxious or stressed, it’s easy to forget to tell your GP something important. So, ahead of your appointment, you can visit the site Doc Ready, where you can download a template which guides through what to ask your GP.


 

I feel lonely

In 2020, people’s sense of loneliness has been heightened due to the lockdown imposed by Cornavirus but people often feel lonely and isolated – as humans, we crave social interaction. No one should suffer alone and in today’s modern world, you do not need to be alone.

Here are some suggestions from the NHS which may help to reduce the sense of loneliness you are feeling;

  • Do you have a friend or family member you could talk to about your feelings?
  • You could contact Samaritans in the UK on 116 123 or email: [email protected] for someone to talk to.
  • Consider joining a class or a group online or physically that focuses on something you enjoy.
  • Sometimes just being around other people, even if you don’t know them, can help you feel less lonely – perhaps make a plan to go to a park or a café. During lockdown this is not always going to be practical, so consider joining an online group with people who have similar interests to you.
  • consider peer support, where people use their experiences to help each other. Find out more about peer support on the Mind website
  • try the 6 ways to feel happier, which are simple lifestyle changes to help you feel more in control and able to cope
  • find out how to raise your self-esteem
  • listen to free mental wellbeing audio guides
  • search and download relaxation and mindfulness apps or online community apps from the NHS apps library

 

I feel anxious

Most people feel anxious at some point but if these feelings begin to affect your life you may need support. It’s not always easy to spot whether you are suffering with anxiety but there are some common signs which are worth you being alert to.

Physical symptoms

  • your heartbeat is consistently faster or more irregular than usual
  • you often feel lightheaded or you are experiencing dizziness
  • you’re experiencing constant headaches or chest pains
  • you have a loss of appetite

Mental symptoms

  • you are often feeling tense or nervous
  • you find you’re unable to relax
  • you are worrying more, particular about the past or the future
  • you suddenly find yourself being tearful
  • you are struggling to sleep

Changes in behaviour

  • you’re no longer enjoying leisure time
  • you’re not looking after yourself – eating, showering, grooming
  • you don’t seem to be able to concentrate at work
  • you’re finding it difficult to maintain relationships
  • you’re worried about trying new things.

Here are some suggestions from the NHS which may help to reduce the sense of anxiety you are feeling;


I feel burnt-out

Burnout is different to feeling stressed according to leading burnout expert, Dr Sonia Hutton-Taylor. Think of stress as a pre-cursor to burnout – you will possibly be suffering with burnout if you constantly feel exhausted and having a good night’s sleep does not leave you feeling refreshed or you take a weekend break and feel worse than you did before you went away.

If you are suffering with burnout then being told to take time off work or employ better sleep hygiene etc is probably the worst advice your employer could give you – people with burnout will often go home and lock themselves away, with only their most dark thoughts for company.

If you feel you’re experiencing burnout, we recommend viewing the website Burnout Geese by one of the Legacy’s partners Dr Sonia Hutton-Taylor


 

I’m not sleeping well

Poor sleep is also strongly associated with diseases such as depression and cancer, among other illnesses and should not be ignored.

It may be that you simply need to improve your sleep hygiene behaviours, such as going to bed at the same time each night or ensuring your mobile phone is not in the same room. Using a sleep, meditation and relaxing app like Calm will help and here is useful advice from the NHS on How to get to sleep.

However, if you are not sleeping at all and this pattern has persisted for some days/weeks, this could be a sign of severe anxiety or depression and we recommend that you contact your GP urgently to book an appointment. This link will take you to Doc Ready, which helps you prepare a template of questions to ask your Doctor, which you might forget if you are tired or feeling stressed.


 

I’m being bullied

If you are experiencing bullying or you know someone who is then you don’t need to suffer in silence – ignoring bullying will not make it go away. Everyone deserves to be heard, valued and respected.

Bullying UK, is operated by Family Lives, which has been operating as a charity since 1999 and provide a confidential helpline 0808 800 2222 or via email at [email protected]

Bullying Online particularly focuses on workplace bullying and was originally set up by Tim Field, who by the of his death in 2006, had become a world authority on bullying and psychiatric injury. His vision was for a bully-free world, and he campaigned in schools, further and higher education, and the workplace to achieve this.He lectured all over the world.

The Cybersmile Foundation is a multi-award-winning nonprofit organization committed to digital wellbeing and tackling all forms of bullying and abuse online. Their aim is to promote kindness, diversity and inclusion by building a safer, more positive digital community.

Bullies Out is an ambitious anti-bullying UK charity providing education, training and support to young people. As well as e-mentoring support, Bullies Out provides innovative, engaging and interactive anti-bullying workshops and training programmes that are developed to reduce bullying in schools and the workplace.

Young Minds supports and empowers children and young people to help promote good mental health and develop resilience to overcome life’s challenges. Bullying affects over 1 million young people every year – it can make you feel isolated, worthless, angry and lacking in confidence.

If you need urgent help you can text YM to 85258. The service is answered 24/7 by trained volunteers and is a free service from most mobile networks.

Childline was started by Esther Rantzen in 1986 and provides help to anyone under 19 in the UK. Childline is a free call service and it doesn’t show up on the phone bill. If you are experiencing bullying you can call 0800 1111.

Contact Conduct Coaching and Nicki Eyre

A Jordan Legacy Partner, Nicki Eyre, is pasionate about stamping out workplace and cyber-bullying and believes that everyone deserves to feel heard, valued and respected. Nicki actively campaigns and lobbys the UK on matters relating to bullying.

Whether you run or work in a company and you’re concerned about how you can avoid or remove bullying in the workplace or you feel you are being bullied personally, then click here to find out how Nicki can help you.


 

I’m self-harming

The fact you have clicked this option means that you are concerned that you are or you’re considering self-harming. Maybe this behaviour is caused by you wanting to distract yourself from or even take back control from experiencing overwhelming feelings or thoughts. Self-harming may release tension from such feelings or thoughts.

Perhaps you’ve been feeling dissociated from reality and life and you by self-harming you at least get to experience some form or sensation, even if that feeling is pain.

Self-harm can be a cry of help or maybe a sign of deeper pyschological concerns – more than 50% of those who complete suicide have a history of self-harm.

There are organisations that offer support and advice for people who self-harm, as well as their friends and families.

These include:

 


 

I may have an eating disorder

You may have an eating disorder if you have an unhealthy relationship with food. Such a relationship may lead you to eat too much or too little or you may find that you’re becoming obsessed with your body shape, size or weight. If your eating disorder becomes severe it can take over your life and make you ill.

Anyone, male or female, can experience an eating disorder but young women aged between 13-17 are more commonly affected. The most common forms of eating disorders are anorexia nervosa, bulimia, binge eating disorder (BED) or other specified feeding or eating disorder (OSFED)

If you are concerned that you may have an eating disorder or you are concerned about someone else, then this NHS webpage will help guide you as to what action to take

Contact SEED – Eating Disorder Support Services

A Jordan Legacy CIC Partner, Emmerdale and Holby City Actress, Gemma Oaten, has recently taken over the running of this incredible charity, initially set up 20 years ago by her mum Marg Oaten MBE and Dad, Dennis. Gemma herself almost died from her experience of an eating disorder.

For more information about the work SEED is doing and how they can help you, please click here.